Elbow and Wrist

Elbow Conditions

Elbow Medial

Tennis elbow is a painful condition occurring when repetitive motions of the wrist and arm overwork tendons in the elbow.

Causes are due to overuse and muscle strain. Repeated motions and stress to the tissues may result in a series of tiny tears in the tendons attaching the forearm muscles to the outside of the elbow. Activities leading to causes may include golf, racket sports, throwing sports, weight lifting, or other wrist bearing activities.

Pain associated may radiate from the outside of the elbow into the forearm and wrist. It may be difficult to shake hands, turn a doorknob, or hold a cup.

A.M.I.T. ® Explanation: Pain that occurs on the outside of the elbow is caused by inhibition of the wrist extensor muscles, inflammation of the periosteal tendon insertions (enthesis) of the extensor muscles (extensor carpi radialis longus, extensor carpi radialis brevis, extensor carpi ulnaris, and extensor digitorum) or over development of the anterior shoulder muscles. Correction of this condition is accomplished by reactivating the extensor muscles and exercising the posterior shoulder muscles.

Golfer’s elbow is similar to tennis elbow; instead the pain occurs on the inside of the elbow, where the tendons of the forearm muscles attach to the bony bump on the inside of the elbow.

Causes are due to damage of the muscles and tendons controlling the wrist and fingers, usually related to excessive or repetitive stress. Activities leading to causes may include golf, racket sports, throwing sports, weight lifting, or other wrist bearing activities.

Pain may include: tenderness on inner side of elbow, stiffness or pain making a fist, weakness in hands or wrists, or numbness and tingling into the ring and little fingers.

A.M.I.T. ® Explanation: Pain occurring on the inside of the elbow is caused by inhibition of the wrist flexor muscles, or over development of the anterior shoulder muscles. Correction of this condition is accomplished by reactivating the flexor muscles and exercising the posterior shoulder muscles.

Wrist Conditions

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome is a progressively painful hand and arm condition caused by a nerve pinched in the wrist.

Carpal tunnel syndrome is caused by compression of the median nerve. The median nerve runs from the forearm, through a passageway in the wrist (carpal tunnel) to the hand. Anything that crowds irritates or compresses the median nerve can lead to pain.

Pain may include tingling or numbness in fingers and hand, pain radiating or extending from the wrist to the arm and shoulder, or down into palm and fingers, or a sense of weakness in hands.

A.M.I.T. ® Explanation: This condition is caused by falling on the hands, jamming the bones in the wrist, repetitive stress, or trauma to the wrist. This leads to compression of the median nerve by the retinaculum supporting the wrist or the inhibition of the pronator quadrates muscle. The symptom may also be due to irritation of nerve roots in the cervical spine. Manipulating the cervical spine or carpal bones can cause a dramatic change in symptoms without surgery. Correction is achieved by manipulating the bones back into alignment or reactivating the pronator quadrates muscle taking the pressure off the nerve.

De Quervain’s Tenosynovitis is a painful condition that affects the two tendons located on the thumb side of the wrist.

De Quervain’s Tenosynovitis may be caused by repeated movement leading to the tendon sheath becoming inflamed and thickened.

Pain may include: pain in wrist, pain at base of thumb, swelling near base of thumb, or difficulty grasping or pinching.

A.M.I.T. ® Explanation: This condition may be caused by multiple traumas to the thumb leading to joint fixation and muscle inhibition. It can be corrected by reactivating the muscles and manipulation of the thumb.

Wrist sprains can be caused by sudden injuries.

Causes of sprains or strains may vary.

Pain may include dull aching or various degrees of pain and tenderness.

A.M.I.T. ® Explanation: Damage to any of the muscles that cross the wrist, or to any of the ligaments that support the wrist, can lead to pain. Jamming of the carpal bones by a fall landing on the extended wrist and hand is the most common cause. Manipulating the bones back into proper alignment creates immediate relief.

Wrist AP